The Cosmetic Pesticide Ban Act (2009) and the changing weather patterns have made lawn care a bit more challenging, but not impossible. A few steps will help you to grow a healthy, hardy, lawn that can compete with weeds and better resist pest and disease. 

Don't put up with a bad lawn just because you can no longer apply pesticides. it is possible to have a great lawn, its just takes a little work.

Don’t put up with a bad lawn just because you can no longer apply pesticides. it is possible to have a great lawn, it just takes a little work.

To do this you need to:

  •   Feed the soil
  •   Choose the right grass type
  •   Practice preventative management
  •   Monitor for pest or disease

Soil is the foundation to healthy plants. It is important to top dress with well-screened, weed-seed free compost. Compost:

  • Provides a whole range of nutrients; it is like a healthy meal versus just vitamins  (fertlizer).
  • Feeds those soil micro-organisms that keep the soil functioning.
  • Increases the water holding capacity of the soil. 

Just like humans, sometimes we may need to supplement our meals with vitamins, research is showing that some fertilizer may be warranted – BUT, applied properly:

  • Only 2x a season is needed, spring and fall.
  • Use a slow release in the fall (no later than Sept 15).
  • Choose one that has a good balance of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K).
  • Do not apply it before an expected rain event.

 A mix of grass species is best, look for a grass seed blend that suits your sun exposure and the amount of wear and tear your lawn receives. Include turf-type ryes and fescues which have longer roots and offer increased pest resistance. Keep an eye out for some very promising new grass species like RTF and RPR which may be listed as “self-repairing”.

For annual lawn maintenance:

  • Aerate, especially for heavily compacted (clay) soil.
  • Top dress your lawn with 1/3 inch of good screened compost
  • Overseed with a mix of grass seeds.
  • Mow properly; with sharp blades, do not cut your grass any lower than 2.5 – 3 inches
  • Leave clippings on your lawn so the water and nitrogen they contain goes right back to the soil.
  • Monitor and properly identify pests so that you know what, how and when to use a control method.

 If you water your lawn, water properly with a maximum of one inch of water a week, including rain. Avoid ‘sprinkling’ watering which promotes a weak shallow root system. If you don’t water your lawn, don’t start once the lawn has gone dormant, it will stress the lawn.

 

I thought I’d share some links with you…
A great lesson from Frank Ferragine (aka Frankie Flowers) on overseeding your lawn. Remember to use a mix of grass seed types for diversity and strength against drought and pests. Look for a mix a Kentucky Blue Grass, Fescue and Perennial Rye.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xijxjll7Y0M&feature=share
Frank’s website is now loaded with great resources on everything outdoors!
http://www.frankieflowers.com
Many of you are likely seeing damage from Meadow Voles in your lawns. Frankie talks about how to reduce and prevent the damage.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgM5jA2DVn0&feature=relmfu
A few short videos from our friends at Pathways to Perennials:
http://www.pathwaystoperennials.com/home-and-garden
A story from CBC radio’s “The Current” on how nature effects your brian, in a good way!
http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode/2011/05/04/urban-by-nature-documentary/
A blog about how important it is for us and for the kids to spend time outdoors in nature:
http://richardlouv.com/blog/
 
ENJOY!
Aileen

If you want a great lawn this summer, you will have to do some work.  The first three tasks should be done at least once a year, twice if you have bad soil, heavy compaction or a thin lawn.

There are 5 recommended tasks for building and maintaining a great lawn:

1. Aerate  – this will reduce compaction and get rid of thatch. No need to if you are on sand

2. Topdress  – this will feed your lawn and improve soil

3. Overseed  – this will thicken your lawn and fill any spaces so weeds won’t establish

4. Mow high  – at least 2 1/2 inches, but in the hotter months 3 inches

5. Don’t over water  – 1 inch, once per week, at most, including rain, or let your lawn go dormant in the summer, it is a natural adaptation.

Time to get to work if you want a great lawn this summer!

Aerate once the lawn has dried up and is no longer damp. After aerating, add a well screened layer of compost to a depth of ¼ to ½ an inch. Adding compost to your lawn is the equivalent to feeding it fruits and vegetables. Compost will add the main nutrients (N, P, K) as well as the micro nutrients needed.

Choose a mixture of grass seed that has several species of grass in it. Remember, with grass seed, you get what you pay for, so a few extra bucks will go a long way with the quality of seed. Spread the seed over the compost and lightly rake it in. Keep the seed moist (not soaking wet) for a period of 8-10 days.

There are many options for grass seed. Buy the best quality for the best results.

They are predicting a bad year for bugs, so applying beneficial nematodes will help prevent damage by pests such as grubs. The key to using these is to follow the directions EXACTLY! Nematodes are now available for purchase at most garden centres and large box stores such as Home Depot or Canadian Tire. They will likely be stored in a fridge, if not; you may want to look for them elsewhere. They need to be kept cold so the nematodes stay in a dormant state before application. I won’t go into specific detail on how the nematodes work, but if you are keen, google it. Don’t say I didn’t warn you!

If your lawn is covered with more than 50% of weeds, and you don’t want the weeds, you should resod, or consider an alternative to your lawn.

In my next post I will tackle weeds…

Aileen

With the unseasonably warm weather we’ve been having lately, it’s hard to resist the urge to go play in the gardens. Some tasks can be detrimental if done too early. To appease your urges; here are some outdoor garden tasks to keep you busy…

This would be a large lawn to rake!

1. Resist the urge to rake your lawn. The ground is still wet and if you have clay soil, walking on it will compact the soil. Compacted soil is bad for turf, but good for weeds. Also raking your lawn too early can easily damage any new grass shoots.

2. Don’t roll your lawn, again, with clay soils, this will compact it.

3. Now is a great time to apply corn gluten to your lawn. This is a natural pre-emergent weed preventative that coats weed seeds and prevents germination of the root from the seed.  Wait 4 – 6 weeks before overseeding as corn gluten will also prevent grass seed from germinating. Corn Gluten will also serve as a fertilizer for your lawn.  Corn Gluten will not kill exisitng weeds. For more details on applicaiton of corn gluten, visit: http://lawncare.about.com/od/organiclawncare/a/corn_gluten.htm

4. Wait to clean up the dead plant materials from your gardens. Once the soil warms up the decomposers will become more active and will start decomposing old plant material. This will add natural organic matter into your soil, which will help to feed this year’s plants.

5. Rather than using a hose to clean off your driveway, use a broom. It is good exercise for you and you won’t be wasting high quality drinking water.

Thanks for the spring "presents"

6. Now that the snow has melted, for those of you with dogs, your lawn will be covered with months of dog droppings that need to be picked up. This is one of those spring clean-up tasks that I do not enjoy. Maybe this year I’ll hire a company to clean these up?

Enjoy your gardens folks, that’s why we have them!

Snow Seeding?

October 13, 2011

Snow Seeding

Timing of your fall lawn overseeding is dependent on the weather. With the past week of unusually hot weather, the typical timeframe of September 15th to October 15th may not have had the best results with grass seed germination.  New advice is starting  to appear on the circuit that is based on old practices. The practice of “snow seeding” or “winter seeding” is when grass seed is applied in northern climates just before the snow falls. The idea is that this will prevent the birds from eating the seed and then will freeze the seeds, preserving them over the winter. The grass seed will be ready for naturally induced germination in the spring.

I have to admit that I have not tried this yet, although for years I have planned  too. From a biological perspective, it makes sense. Think about how many fall flowers, trees and shrubs cast seed at the end of the season, only to begin germination the following spring. Why not grass?  I would imagine that a late season warm spell, a late frost or other unusual weather patterns may hamper this process, reducing or even eliminating the spring germination.

For me, the best feature of this technique would be that I wouldn’t have to be out with the hose daily keeping the seeds moist until they germinate. As a water conservation professional, and a lazy gardener, this works for me! (Plus, my outdoor hose bib has been broken for years; I have embraced this as a challenge to have a landscape that does not use any tap water.)

Lots of snow to protect your grass seed.

Has anyone tried this technique? I’d be interested in
hearing about your experience with this.