I moved into a new house in August and couldn’t stand the front yard. I got to work right away at adding some curb appeal. It wasn’t hard at all! The photo below was 7-8 hours work and $200 (being the end of the season, I got some great deals!)

At the beginning….

Image

The Steps:

  1. Choose your Space – Consider location, snow piles, dog’s peeing, ease of mowing, postman paths and kid routes.
  2. Plan and Design – Iscape and other apps, use other gardens for inspiration, be realistic about the size and maintenance
  3. Utilities Check – Ontario One Call!
  4. Get Rid of the Grass – Dig it out, solarize or sheet mulching. Make sure you get rid of ALL the grass and roots
  5. Amend  the Soil – Compost made from yard waste/ vegetative matter is the best!
  6. Choose your Plants  – Consider hydrozones, choose non-invasive (watching out for “spreads easily” on the plant tag), use some native plants, shrubs are a must have and VERY low maintenance, look for drought tolerant, hardy perennials.
  7. Mulch –  natural products are the best (wood chips, cedar, pine bark), 2-3 inches
  8. Efficient Irrigation – water only when necessary – use your finger to see if the soil is dry down 2-3 inches before adding any water), check the forecast!

Digging the edge…

Image

The Plants I used (although the weren’t planted in the “after” photo below”:

Daffodils – Narcissus

Purple Coneflower – Echinacea Purpea

Sedum Autumn Joy “Purple Emperor”

Dwarf Goatsbeard – Aruncus aethusfolius

Coral Bells – Heuchera “Peach Flambe”

The Shrubs:

Tiger Eye Sumac – Rhus Typhina “Tiger Bailtiger”

Ninebark – Physcocarpus opulifolius “Diablo”

Emerald Cedar – Thuja occidentalis “Smaragd”

Golden Globe Cedar – Thuja occidentalis”Golden Globe”

 Almost done….

Image

What I wanted to Plant if I had more sun….

Lavender – Lavandula angustifolia

Allium – Allium Spp – they are all great but have to be planted in the fall

Butterfly Weed – Asclepias tuberosa

Variegated Iris – Iris Pallida “variegata”

 Time and Water: Precious resources wasted on the pursuit of a green lawn!

How to save money on your new garden?

  • ˜Fall Discounts – up to 50%, but no warranty…
  • ˜Donations from friends– but be CAREFUL!
  • ˜Buy bulk mulch and compost
  • ˜Investment plants; shrubs and perennials – no annuals
  • ˜Less watering needed when planted in the fall – and choosing drought tolerant plants and shrubs means less/no watering next year!
  • ˜Reuse the existing plants until fall sales start (if you are impatient like me…)
Its not that hard, let me know if you have any questions!
Happy Gardening!
Aileen

The qualities of Lavender seem endless; it is used for aromatherapy, antibacterial properties, cooking, insect resistance and many other uses. My preferred use is in my garden as one of my favorite focal points. It’s long lasting blooms and tough “I don’t need no water” attitude make it a perfect resident for a full sun, well drained, drought tolerant garden.

The perfect plant for a hot, sunny location

In the spring, it may look a little ragged. Feel free to cut it back a bit, or do as I do, just ignore it and wait for the new growth to cover up any ugly old growth. When it flowers you can cut off a few of the flowers spikes, tie them together and let them dry for an all-natural air freshener.

When out and about in your garden, try rubbing a few of the leaves into your hands for a nice aromatic scent while you weed, read or enjoy some wine. Lavender is reported to help you relax, so with some wine, you will no doubt feel great in your garden.

Even the butterflies love Lavender…

The technical info:

Blooms: From June through to end of summer/early fall

Exposure: Full sunColour: Lavender (yes, I get the irony)

Water: Lavender likes it hot and dry, the conditions it adapted to in its native climate of the Mediterranean and Africa.

Combination ideas: The greyish coloured leaves and light purple flowers go great with white, pink or dark purple colours. Avoid combining with plants with reddish or brown undertones. Try it with Salvia, Blazing star, Little Blue Stem, Catmint, or Shasta Daisies. Another option is to use lavender as a small hedge or border.

Shopping:  A very common plant, easily found in most garden centres. Make sure you get the English Lavender, which is hardy to zone 5.

Growing Vegetables

April 26, 2012

More and more people are growing vegetables in their gardens, which is a great idea! I often hear from people “I rarely water my garden, well, except my vegetables, I water those every day”. Why are those the exception? You can have a water-efficient vegetable garden without constant watering.

Here are some tips to create a water effiicent vegetable garden:

  • Use a rain gauge to keep track of how much rain has fallen during the week. Only add water if there hasn’t been sufficient rainfall (one inch per week)
  • Water more deeply but less frequently to encourage deeper, more vigorous root growth.
  • Time your watering to when the plants need it most in their life cycle.  For soft fruits such as tomatoes, this is as their fruit is setting, for leafy vegetables, as their hearts develop; for peas and beans, when they are flowering, and for potatoes, when the tubers begin to form.
  • Group vegetables and herbs according to moisture needs (hydrozone).   Herbs such as rosemary, sage, oregano, winter savory and thyme have better flavour when grown in hot, dry conditions.
  • Perennial vegetables such as asparagus and rhubarb do not need frequent watering, if at all.
  • Whatever your soil type, make sure to add lots of organic matter, preferably good compost, to increase the water holding capacity of the soil to reduce the amount of supplemental watering.
  • Prepare a flat soil surface.  Raised areas such as hills dry out more quickly, and water runs away from the root zone and is wasted.
  • Use mulch, it retains moisture in the soil, controls weeds, stabilizes the soil temperature, and insulates roots, providing protection from heat stress. (Using straw allows more water loss to evaporation than woodchips. I have been growing vegetables in 2-3 inches of woodchip mulch and have had good success, with virtually no water).
  • Water based on soil moisture, not plant tag recommendations. Soil should be dry to a depth of around two inches before adding any supplemental water.

When was the last time you saw a farmer watering his pumpkin patch?

If you are growing vegetables this season, why not grow an extra row and share it with a local shelter? The Compost Council of Canada has a great program called “Plant a Row, Grow a Row”, check it out at: http://www.growarow.org/

Happy Gardening!

Aileen